AOM 2019 Symposium – Identity in and around Entrepreneurial Families – August 13th from 8:00 – 9:30am in the Grand Ballroom Salon I at the Boston Marriott Copley Place

AOM 2019 Presenter Symposium – Identity in and around Entrepreneurial Families

Tuesday, August 13th from 8:00 – 9:30am in the Grand Ballroom Salon I at the Boston Marriott Copley Place.

Organizer:

Eliana Crosina – Babson College

Discussant:

William Gartner – Babson College

Presenters (*) and Co-authors:

From a Family to a Family Business? On the Role of Identity Anchors in the Construction of a Family Business
Eliana Crosina* – Babson College

How Psychological Needs Motivate Family Firm Identifications and Identifiers: A Framework and Future Research Agenda
Kimberly Elsbach* – University of California, Davis
Torsten Pieper – University of North Carolina, Charlotte

The Hitching Post: How Can Amish Entrepreneurs Achieve Optimal Distinctiveness in a Modern, Technology-Driven Society?
Blake Mathias* – Indiana University
Trent Williams – Indiana University

Entrepreneurial legacy: Images of Facilitating or Inhibiting Successor Entrepreneurial Identity
Miruna Radu-Lefebvre* – Audencia University
Vincent Lefebvre – Audencia University
Jean Clarke  – EMLYON Business School
William Gartner – Babson College

A Novel (’s) Perspective on Identity in the Entrepreneurial Family
Mattias Nordqvist* – Jönköping University

(*) Indicates Presenter.

OVERVIEW OF SYMPOSIUM

Psychologists and sociologists have long recognized the power of identity in shaping individuals’ thoughts and actions (e.g., Tajfel & Turner 1979; Stryker & Serpe, 1982). More recently, management and entrepreneurship researchers have also invoked identity to explain individuals’ cognitions and behaviors in the work place (see Ashforth, Harrison & Corley, 2008 for review). For example, management scholars suggest that identity can influence organizational members’ motivation and task performance (e.g., van Knippenberg, 2000), their turnover intentions (e.g., Mael & Ashforth, 1995; van Dick et al., 2004), commitment (Haslam et al., 2006), as well as their sharing of information (e.g., Tyler, 1999; Grice et al., 2006). Entrepreneurship researchers recognize the power of identity in the entrepreneurial process (e.g., Hoang & Gimeno, 2010; Fauchart & Gruber, 2011; Navis & Glynn, 2011; Powell & Baker, 2014). To illustrate, Fauchart and Gruber (2011) found that founders1’ social identities shape their markets in which entrepreneurs operate, as well as the resources they leverage to bring their ideas to fruition. Similarly, Cardon and colleagues (2009) argued that founders’ self-defining roles influence how they create their businesses; and Powell and Baker (2014) cast identity as central even to how entrepreneurs respond to adversity.
Issues of identity are especially relevant in the context of family businesses – organizations “held by a dominant coalition controlled by members of the same family or a small number of families in a manner that is potentially sustainable across generations of the family or families” (Chua, Chrisman, & Sharma, 1999). Notably, unlike other types of entrepreneurial ventures, family-run enterprises generally revolve around multiple, intersecting, personal and work-related identities held by members both individually and, more collectively, at the level of the family and of the business (Shepherd & Haynie, 2009).
On the one hand, entrepreneurship and family business researchers indicate that such identities are very important as they anchor the business, but that they also constitute a central source of conflict among family members (Shepherd & Haynie, 2009). On the other hand, identity scholars (e.g., Pratt & Foreman, 2000) suggest that individuals can find productive ways to manage multiple salient conflicting identities. However, the dearth of empirical research in this specific domain – that is, identity in/around family businesses, makes it unclear how and why family members might differentially manage their multiple identities, and with what possible implications for their well-being, and their family firms.
Unique in family businesses or in entrepreneurial families – terms we use here to denote both mature multi-generational family enterprises, as well as nascent family-run organizations based on kinship and/or on socially constructed family-like relationships – is the chronological ordering and interdependence of multiple salient identities. Indeed, in most cases, one’s membership in, and role as a family member precedes one’s membership in and role as a member of the business. Further, expectations around family role/membership often influence those of role/membership in the business (e.g., Rothbard, 2001; Rothbard & Edwards, 2003; Shepherd & Haynie, 2009). Taken together, these characteristics of entrepreneurial families make them an ideal site to explore issues of identity, including its construction and upkeep, as well as multiple identity management strategies (e.g., Pratt & Foreman, 2000).
Indeed, scholars have pleaded for additional research in this area. Specifically, they have invited methodological plurality, including the deployment of qualitative and interdisciplinary research (e.g., De Massis & Kotlar, 2014; Chrisman et al., 2008), and more specifically “different extensions or applications of grounded theory and intensive qualitative research such as ethnography.” (Velasco, Garcia, & Parra, 2013: 46)
Each one of the five papers in this symposium allows us to explore different facets of identity in/around entrepreneurial families, to consider new influences, mechanisms, and understandings of identity alongside family, and ultimately to raise new questions for future research. In particular, the first and last presentations by Crosina and Nordqvist examine the dynamic formation and maintenance of identity in the context of a newly formed, and in that of a more mature, family business. The second presentation by Elsbach and Pieper explores motives for invoking identity as basis for self-definition in family firms. More specifically, it provides a conceptual framework to understand why family members may identify with their family firm, and with what consequences. The third presentation by Mathias and Trent explores a different side of identification in entrepreneurial families, unveiling various loci of identification among Amish entrepreneurs. In doing so, Mathias and Trent expand traditional understandings of “family” beyond kinship, to encompass “family” as socially constructed. Finally, Radu-Lefebvre and colleagues address issues of succession and identity in multi-generational organizations, suggesting innovative ways to surface the paradox of preserving the past while innovating for the future.
More specifically, in the first presentation, Crosina shares preliminary findings from an ongoing, longitudinal, field study that explores the formation of a family business. Through a combination of data from MediaCo and its three co-founders, she theorizes the dynamic co-evolution of the organization’s activities and identity. Notably, she finds that MediaCo’s identity emerges in relation to: (1) the types of clients MediaCo secures; (2) the creative work that the company produces; as well as (3) the changing familial dynamics among co-founders.
In the second presentation, Elsbach and Pieper theorize a number of different psychological needs and motives (e.g., for self-esteem, continuity, distinctiveness, belonging) that motivate identification with family firms. Based on a framework of these motives, their specific influence on, as well as outcomes of family firm identification, the authors propose promising avenues for future research.
In the third presentation, Mathias and Trent present preliminary insights from their ongoing qualitative study of Amish entrepreneurs. Among others, they explore the unique social identity of such entrepreneurs, including how the Amish strive to maintain central aspects of their identity (e.g., family, community and craftsmanship) while restricting/rejecting others (e.g., technology).
In the fourth presentation, Radu-Lefebvre and colleagues leverage drawings and accompanying narratives from successors of high-profile French companies that depict the family firm – including its origins, current state, and successors’ vision for the organization’s future. In doing so, they theorize how successors differentially create prospective organizational identities as they manage the paradox of preserving the family legacy while seeking to “evolve and diverge” from the past (Hammond, Pearson & Holt, 2006: 1220).
To conclude, Nordqvist proposes a parallel between identity dynamics in the family context and the Swedish novel The Head of the Firm. Drawing from this novel, the author suggests that the identity of a family entrepreneur morphs in relation to conflicting family, business, societal norms and expectations. In doing so, Nordqvist brings to the fore the dynamic construction of identity (including triggers for identity work) in the context of a family business, and models a novel methodological approach to study identity in family firms.

1 Throughout this submission, we use “founder” interchangeably with “entrepreneur.”

AOM – Family Entrepreneurship Education for an Inclusive Organization – Saturday, August 10th, from 8:00 – 10:00

Saturday, August 10th, from 8:00 – 10:00 in the Boston Mariott Copley Place, Grand Ballroom Salon ABC.

Chairs: Esra Memili, Kathleen Randerson, Natalia Vershinina

This PDW showcases a wide variety of pedagogical practices, tools and resources. During hands-on activities, experts will share innovative pedagogical practices and resources. This PDW brings together key actors in FEE who are willing to share their insights and experiences. One topic per table, experts will share their experience, insights, and answer questions from attendees. The workshop will be divided into 20-minute segments to allow attendees to participate in several tables. The line-up of topics and experts:

 

1Highlighting different cultural contexts through case studies : Latin AmericaFernando Sandoval

Ana Gonzales

Claudio Müller

2Highlighting different cultural contexts through case studies: AsiaMarleen Dieleman

Andrea Santiago

3Highlighting different cultural contexts through case studies: North AmericaPatricia Angus 
4Highlighting different cultural contexts through case studies: EuropeAllan Discua Cruz

Mattias Nordqvist

5Going from a STEP case to a teaching caseCatherine Faherty

Luis Diaz

6Preparing teams of students for the Global Case CompetitionPromodita Sharma

Rocki-Lee DeWitt

Massimo Bau

7Online resources

 

Kim Eddleston (FamilyBusiness.org)

Thomas Zellweger (the Family Business Navigator)

8Cross-disciplinary approach in teachingErik Monsen

Jerry Katz

Dianne Welsh

9Involving family business owners and managersSherri Noxel

Carol Wittmeyer

10Innovative approaches in teaching family entrepreneurship at graduate levelsReinhard Prugl
11Bringing the self into family entrepreneurship learningIsabell Botero
12Family Entrepreneurship Executive Education:

 

Vincent Lefebvre

Jim Cater

13Pedagogical practices targeting non-family members working for a family business or advisors to family businessesAlfredo De Massis

Kathleen Randerson

Lloyd Steier

14Editor’s table: no preparation required.Torsten Pieper (Journal of Family Business Strategy)

Tyge Payne (Family Business Review)

Jim Cater (Journal of Family Business Management)

(TBC) Entrepreneurship  & Regional Development

 CALL FOR PAPERS Journal of Family Business Management Special Issue on “Responsible Ownershipin Family Firms: a focus on the Family”

SI_JFBM_Responsible Ownership_Final

Guest Editors:

Luis Díaz-Matajira (luidiaz@uniandes.edu.co), Universidad de los Andes, Colombia

Kathleen Randerson (kranderson@audencia.com), Audencia Business School, France

Joshua J. Daspit (josh.daspit@txstate.edu), Texas State University, USA

Cristina Aragón-Amonarriz (cristina.aragon@deusto.es), Deusto Business School, Spain

Manuscript Submission Deadline: OCTOBER 1, 2019

The family’s involvement in firm governance is noted as a core driver that creates heterogeneity among family firms (Daspit, Chrisman, Sharma, Pearson, & Mahto, 2018). This form of governance allows the family to exert decision-making influence and control in the firm, while also pursuing actions that are for the good of the family (Carney, 2005). Although this governance form allows the family to exert control over the firm, the goals of the family and firm are not always aligned, and, in fact, can be quite divergent. Thus, for both the business and the family to succeed, responsible decision-making and responsible actions are paramount.

Responsible ownership is defined as the “active and long-term commitment to the family, the business, and the community, and [the ability to balance]these commitments with each other” (Lambrecht & Uhlaner, 2005). A responsible owner engages in behavior that serves the collective good of both the owners and the firm (Uhlaner, Flӧren, & Geerlings, 2007). When the family is in a governance role, responsible family ownership manifests when the family, as a group, is committed to balancing the rights and privileges of ownership with a long-term commitment to family and other (nonfamily) stakeholders of the firm (Aragón-Amonarriz, Arredondo, & Iturrioz-Landart, 2017).

Although studies are beginning to examine the effect of responsible ownership on family firm assets and outcomes (e.g., Berent-Braun & Uhlaner, 2012), even less is known about how family firms develop and sustain responsible ownership across generations. For example, Aragón-Amonarriz et al. (2017) suggest that family social capital preserves responsible family ownership across generations, yet Bergamaschi and Randerson (2016) note that differing types of family firms yield varied preferences for engaging in socially responsible actions. Further, while researchers are beginning to examine the various pathways used by families to instill responsible ownership in the future generation, these processes, intentions, and norms vary greatly across geographical and cultural contexts (e.g., González Couture & Díaz Matajira, 2015).

In all, given the nascent nature of insights and the growing importance of responsible governance, a special issue on responsible ownership promises to offers a substantial advancement to the field of family business. The objective of this special issue is to publish theoretical and empirical work that highlights notable progress and furthers understanding of responsible ownership in the family firm. A non-exhaustive list of possible topics includes:

  • How do family members become responsible owners? How do family firms strategicallyprepare current and next generation owners?
  • What is the role played by family values and/or different types of reciprocity in developingresponsible ownership that is sustainable in the family firm?
  • What theories from family science offer advanced understanding of how responsible familyownership is developed and leveraged in the family firm?
  • What are the effects of cultural, economic, institutional, and other contextual influences onresponsible ownership and the family?
  • How do family owners balance the responsibility of serving multiple stakeholders with oftendivergent interests?
  • How does responsible family ownership (simultaneously) affect family and firm financial,nonfinancial internal, and nonfinancial external outcomes?

 

Submission Guidelines: All submissions are subject to a standard double-blind review process. Manuscripts must be original, unpublished works not concurrently under review for publication at another outlet and are expected to follow the standard formatting guidelines for Journal of Family Business Management. Final manuscripts are to be submitted via the journal’s submission system (https://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/jfbm) no later than October 1, 2019. Authors should indicate “Special Issue” as the manuscript type and must clearly specify that the submission is for the special issue on “Responsible Ownership in Family Firms” in the cover letter. Publication of this Special Issue is expected for 2021. Workshop: Authors interested in further developing an idea for this special issue are encouraged (but not required) to submit an abstract to the European Institute for Advanced Studies in Management (EIASM) meeting that will be held at Audencia Business School in Nantes, France, May 23-25, 2019. The deadline for submitting conference abstracts is January 21, 2019. All conference submissions are to be made via the EIASM submission system (http://www.eiasm.org/frontoffice/event_announcement.asp?event_id=1381). Please note that acceptance to the workshop does not guarantee nor is it required for acceptance to the special issue. REFERENCES

Aragón-Amonarriz, C., Arredondo, A. M., & Iturrioz-Landart, C. (2017). How can responsible family ownership be sustained across generations? A family social capital approach. Journal of Business Ethics. DOI 10.1007/s10551-017-3728-7

Bergamaschi, M., & Randerson, K. (2016). The futures of family businesses and the development of corporate social responsibility. Futures, 75, 54-65.

Carney, M. (2005). Corporate governance and competitive advantage in family-controlled firms. Entrepreneurship Theory and Practice, 29(3), 249–265

Berent-Braun, M. M., & Uhlaner, L. M. (2012). Family governance practices and teambuilding: Paradox of the enterprising family. Small Business Economics, 38(1), 103-119.

Daspit, J. J., Chrisman, J. J., Sharma, P., Pearson, A. W., & Mahto, R. V. (2018). Governance as a source of family firm heterogeneity. Journal of Business Research, 84, 293-300.

González Couture, G., & Díaz Matajira, L. (2015). The next generation: Pathways for preparing and involving new owners in Colombian family businesses. In P. Sharma, N. Auletta, R.-L. DeWitt, M. J. Parada, & M. Yusof (Eds.), Developing Next Generation Leaders for Transgenerational Entrepreneurial Family Enterprises (p. 49-75). Northhampton, MA: Edward Elgar.

Lambrecht, J. & Uhlaner, L.M. (2005). Responsible ownership of the family business: State-of-the-art, position paper prepared for FBN-

IFERA World Academic Research forum, EHSAL, Brussels, September. https://www.researchgate.net/publication/228379201_RESPONSIBLE_OWNERSHIP_OF_THE_FAMILY_BUSINESS_STATE-OF-THE-ART

Uhlaner, L.M., Flören, R. & Geerlings, J.R. (2007). Ownership commitment, family ownership and performance in the privately-held firm, Small Business Economics Journal, 29(3), 275-293.

CfP Special Issue – Entreprendre & Innover – Entreprises Familiales et Famille en Affaires : l’entrepreneuriat est-il une affaire de famille ?

Éditeurs du dossier :

  • Miruna Radu-Lefebvre, Audencia
  • Céline Barrédy, Université Paris Nanterre
  • Alain Fayolle, emlyon business school

Thématique du numéro spécial

appel à com EI n 41 Entrepreneuriat Familial

Les entreprises familiales représentent la grande majorité des entreprises au niveau mondial que ce soit dans les pays développés ou émergents1. Selon Fanny Letier, directrice de l’activité PME à la banque publique Bpifrance2, 83% des entreprises françaises en font partie, toute taille et secteur confondus. Pourtant, ce n’est que depuis quelques décennies que le champ disciplinaire du « family business » a vu le jour et démarré son développement, en parallèle et souvent de manière étanche par rapport au champ disciplinaire connexe, celui de l’entrepreneuriat. Ces deux champs se sont structurés et développés séparément, avec leurs propres spécialistes et leurs propres terrains, leurs modèles théoriques, leurs journaux et leurs conférences dédiées. Pourtant, leur proximité est réelle3 et leur dialogue nécessaire en raison du rôle reconnu joué par la famille dans la genèse et la transmission de l’esprit entrepreneurial et des compétences entrepreneuriales, également de l’intention entrepreneuriale ou encore des comportements entrepreneuriaux4. C’est ce qui explique l’émergence, lors des dernières années, d’un nouveau champ de recherche, « l’entrepreneuriat familial », situé à l’intersection de l’entrepreneuriat, du family business, de la sociologie et de la psychologie de la famille.

Si le champ du family business s’intéresse aux entreprises familiales caractérisées comme des entreprises dont la propriété et/ou le contrôle reviennent majoritairement à une ou des famille(s) dont l’intention est de transmettre l’entreprise de génération en génération5, l’entrepreneuriat familial englobe ce champ tout en le dépassant. Il pose comme objet d’étude central le phénomène entrepreneurial au sein des familles en affaires et des entreprises familiales. Le focus de l’entrepreneuriat familial relève ainsi de l’étude des pratiques et des comportements entrepreneuriaux des individus, des familles, et des entreprises6. Pourquoi s’intéresser au phénomène entrepreneurial dans ce cadre précis de la famille et des entreprises familiales ? En effet, il a été montré que la pérennité et la croissance des entreprises familiales multigénérationnelles dépendent étroitement de la présence et de l’importance des pratiques et des comportements entrepreneuriaux chez les membres de la famille, comme chez les employés et les managers externes7.

L’environnement sociodémographique, légal, économique et culturel des familles en affaires évolue rapidement au travers du monde. Ces évolutions influencent à la fois le comportement des membres des familles en affaires mais également celui des entreprises familiales elles-mêmes. Des enjeux de définition de la famille, des questions liées au genre et aux nouvelles ambitions et revendications des femmes, l’intérêt croissant à la fois de la sphère économique et de la sphère politique pour les impacts sociaux et environnementaux des entreprises transforment en profondeur le paysage dans lequel les entreprises familiales opèrent aujourd’hui. Les contours légaux de la famille au premier rang desquels les familles recomposées, l’adoption ainsi que leurs évolutions récentes comme le mariage homosexuel ou encore la procréation médicalement assistée pour toutes les femmes, interrogent les dynamiques entrepreneuriales et leur évolutions consécutives dans le cadre de l’entreprise familiale. Pour bien comprendre les dynasties familiales, il faut prendre en compte le droit de la famille88. Les dispositifs institutionnels de soutien de l’entrepreneuriat et du repreneuriat, ainsi que le cadre institutionnel relatif à la transmission intergénérationnelle de la propriété de l’entreprise familiale affectent les choix relatifs à la création et à la transmission de ces entreprises dans le cadre de la famille ou à un tiers9.

Les propositions traiteront, entre autres, des sujets suivants :

  • Comment se transmet l’esprit entrepreneurial au sein des familles en affaires ? Quels rôles jouent l’histoire familiale, les interactions avec le dirigeant, les apprentissages formels et informels dans cette transmission ? Quelles pratiques entrepreneuriales peut-on observer au sein des familles en affaires et comment peut-on les étudier et les appréhender, à travers quels choix méthodologiques et quelles approches théoriques ?
  • Quel est l’impact des comportements entrepreneuriaux (ou intrapreneuriaux) du dirigeant, du successeur, ou des managers externes sur la performance des entreprises familiales ?
  • Comment les membres des familles en affaires gèrent-ils la superposition de rôles sociaux appartenant à des univers distincts (famille, entreprise, actionnariat) lorsqu’ils lancent de nouvelles activités au sein de l’entreprise ou souhaitent introduire des innovations, changer d’orientation stratégique ou revisiter l’identité organisationnelle ?
  • Quels outils formels et informels la famille mobilise-t-elle pour transmettre et / ou générer l’esprit d’entreprendre au sein des nouvelles générations ?
  • Les doctrines institutionnelles conduisent-elles à des comportements entrepreneuriaux distincts au sein des familles ?

Les dates principales à retenir sont:

Soumission des textes

Au plus tard le 30 avril 2019

Parution Septembre 2019

Soumissions (également accessible à : https://entreprendreetinnover.com/soumettre/ )

Les consignes aux auteurs sont accessibles ici: Consignes aux auteurs E&I – janvier 2014. Il est imperatif de les respecter lorsque vous envoyez votre soumission.

Les articles doivent etre envoyes exclusivement en format Word a Elisabeth GELAS a l’adresse gelas@em‐lyon.com en mentionnant le titre de l’appel en objet et le N° correspondant.

Il est expressement demande aux auteurs de joindre a leur soumission d’article les documents suivants (disponibles sur le site de la revue) dument remplis:

  • La fiche descriptive disponible ici: Fiche soumission d’article E&I – janvier 2014.
  • La declaration d’honneur anti‐plagiat disponible ici: Declaration anti‐plagiat 2014‐0824

Veuillez prendre note que sans ces documents, l’article ne pourra pas etre examine par la redaction.

1 Gedajlovic, E., Carney, M., Chrisman, J. J., & Kellermanns, F. W. (2012). The adolescence of family firm research taking stock and planning for the future. Journal of Management, 38 (4): 1010–1037.

2 Arriver, D., & Jacquot, B. (2016). Les entreprises familiales toujours au coeur de l’économie, Le Figaro, 14 décembre.

3 Sharma, P., Hoy, F., Astrachan, J. H., & Koiranen, M. (2007). The practice-driven evolution of family business education. Journal of Business Research, 60(10), 1012-1021

4 Aldrich, H. E., & Cliff, J. E. (2003). The pervasive effects of family on entrepreneurship: Toward a family embeddedness perspective. Journal of business venturing, 18(5), 573-596.

Fayolle, A., & Bégin, L. (2009). Entrepreneuriat familial: croisement de deux champs ou nouveau champ issu d’un double croisement?. Management international, 14(1), 11-23

5 Chua, J. H., Chrisman, J. J., & Sharma, P. (1999). Defining the family business by behavior. Entrepreneurship theory and practice, 23(4), 19-39.

6 Bégin, L., Chabaud, D., & Richomme-Huet, K. (2010). Vers une approche contingente des entreprises familiales. Revue française de gestion, (1), 79-86.

Bettinelli, C., Sciascia, S., Randerson, K., & Fayolle, A. (2017). Researching Entrepreneurship in Family Firms. Journal of Small Business Management, 55(4), 506-529.

Chabaud, D. (2013). Les entreprises familiales au coeur de l’entrepreneuriat?. Le grand livre de l’entrepreneuriat. Paris, Dunod,157-172.

Chabaud, D., & Sammut, S. (2014). Entrepreneuriat et entreprises familiales, de la proximité à un champ de recherche spécifique. Revue de l’entrepreneuriat, 13(3), 7-10.

Radu-Lefebvre, M.., & Lefebvre, V. (2016). Anticipating intergenerational management transfer of family firms: A typology of next generation’s future leadership projections. Futures, 75, 66-82.

7 Randerson, K., Bettinelli, C., Fayolle, A., & Anderson, A. (2015). Family entrepreneurship as a field of research: Exploring its contours and contents. Journal of Family Business Strategy, 6(3), 143-154.

Randerson, K., Dossena, G., & Fayolle, A. (2016). The futures of family business: family entrepreneurship. Futures, (75), 36-43.

8 Marcus, G. E. (1991). Law in the development of dynastic families among American business elites: The domestication of capital and the capitalization of family. Family Business Review, 4(1), 75-111.

9 Barrédy, C. (2016). In search of future alternatives for family business: Family law contributions through Civil and Common Law comparison. Futures, 75, 44-53.

Jaskiewicz, P., Combs, J. G., & Rau, S. B. (2015). Entrepreneurial legacy: Toward a theory of how some family firms nurture transgenerational entrepreneurship. Journal of Business Venturing, 30(1), 29-49

2nd Global STEP Conference Cartagena, Colombia 2018 – October 18th – 20th – Transgenerational Entrepreneurship: Insights from the STEP – Call for Proposals

2nd Global STEP Conference – Cartagena, Colombia 2018 – October 18th – 20th – Transgenerational Entrepreneurship: Insights from the STEP – Project Call for Proposals

STEP Conference Flyer Jan 2018

How to register to STEP Conference

Date of the conference: October 18th- 20th , 2018

Hosts: Universidad de los Andes and Universidad Icesi. Colombia

Location Venue: Universidad de los Andes, Cartagena campus

Location Hotel: Las Americas Hotel, Cartagena, Colombia

Those invited to participate: Any scholar from a STEP Affiliated University + co-authors

 

Three years ago, the STEP Project scholars decided to create this conference with the purpose of sharing knowledge, research ideas, insigths and best practices generated through the Project, since its beginnings in 2006. The Boston STEP Conference accomplished this goal and also became an excellent opportunity to start research collaborations, get feedback and increase our networking opportunities.

As in the first Conference in Boston in 2016, this Conference welcomes proposals representing original (unpublished) research from any and all members of the STEP community. Proposals addressing any aspect of transgenerational entrepreneurship and familiness, are welcome. Works utilizing data from the STEP global survey or STEP case studies are specifically encouraged, but research utilizing data from all sources is invited. All types of scholarly work is also welcome and encouraged including, but not limited to; qualitative studies, quantitative studies, conceptual works and teaching cases, at different stages of development.

Following the lead of the First Conference, this conference will include several opportunities to present and obtain feedback on your research. Scholars of all levels will find value in presenting research at all stages. Traditional paper sessions, poster sessions, round tables and other methods of presenting and sharing scholarly work will all be a part of the conference.

Scholars can benefit from sessions focused on publishing advice and journal choice from experienced editorial board members. Scholars looking to start new collaborative projects will benefit from facilitated brainstorming sessions focused on developing ideas for new collaborative research projects. We look forward to see you in beautiful Cartagena, to share the research efforts of our STEP community.

 

Proposal Submission Process

Interested scholars should submit a 3 page proposal (excluding references, tables, figures and diagrams). Submitted proposals should include: 1) a 150 word abstract, 2) Introduction (focused on the importance/contribution of the research) 3) abbreviated literature review 4) summary of hypotheses and findings, theory development, analysis, teaching process and outcomes, research propositions or other appropriate research outcomes.

Proposals should be submitted as a PDF to step@babson.edu . As part of the submission process, submitters should indicate their preferences for their top three modes of sharing their research taken from the list below.

  • Traditional paper session
  • Poster Session
  • Roundtable discussion (similar methods)
  • Roundtable discussion (similar topics)
  • Developmental Session (feedback from senior scholars)

 

Important Dates (2018)

  • Call for Proposals – Submission process open March 4onference registration open March 4
  • Deadline for Submission April 29
  • Acceptance decisions and feedback June 17
  • Deadline for reduced fee registration July 15
  • Final Conference schedule including individual time slots August 19
  • Deadline for registration September 16
  • Conference Dates October 18th – 20th

 

Special Issues associated with the conference

http://emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/call_for_papers.htm?id=7409

 Estudios Gerenciales http://www.icesi.edu.co/estudios_gerenciales/es/

Cross Cultural & Strategic Management Special Issue on “FAMILY BUSINESS AND LOCAL DEVELOPMENT IN IBEROAMERICA”, Guest Editors: Luis Gomez-Mejia, Arizona State University, USA, Claudio G. Muller, University of Chile, Chile, Ana Cristina Gonzalez, Grand Valley State University, USA, Rodrigo Basco, American University of Sharjah, Sheikh Saoud bin Khalid bin Khalid Al-Qassimi Chair in Family Business, UAE.

Call for 2nd STEP Global Academic Conference

CALL FOR THE 2ND STEP GLOBAL ACADEMIC CONFERENCE

We are pleased to announce the Call For Proposals for the 2nd STEP GLOBAL ACADEMIC CONFERENCE.

Three years ago, the STEP Project scholars decided to create this conference with the purpose of sharing knowledge, research ideas, insights and best practices generated through the Project, since its beginnings in 2006. The Boston STEP Conference accomplished this goal and also became an excellent opportunity to start research collaborations, get feedback and increase our networking opportunities.

As in the first Conference in Boston in 2016, this Conference welcomes proposals representing original (unpublished) research from any and all members of the STEP community. Proposals addressing any aspect of transgenerational entrepreneurship and familiness, are welcome. Works utilizing data from the STEP global survey or STEP case studies are specifically encouraged, but research utilizing data from all sources is invited. All types of scholarly work is also welcome and encouraged including, but not limited to; qualitative studies, quantitative studies, conceptual works and teaching cases.

Following the lead of the first Conference in Boston, this conference will include several opportunities to present and obtain feedback on your research. Scholars of all levels will find value in presenting research at all stages. Traditional paper sessions, poster sessions, round tables and other methods of presenting and sharing scholarly work will all be a part of the conference.

Scholars can benefit from sessions focused on publishing advice and journal choice from experienced editorial board members. Scholars looking to start new collaborative projects will benefit from facilitated brainstorming sessions focused on developing ideas for new collaborative research projects. We look forward to see you in beautiful Cartagena, to share the research efforts of our STEP community.

 

Important Information:

Call For Proposals is open March 4, 2018.

Date of the STEP conference: October 18th– 20th 2018

Location Venue:  Cartagena, Colombia

Those invited to participate: Any scholar from a STEP Affiliated University + co-authors

We encourage you to submit a proposal and participate in the engaged community of scholars at our second STEP Global Academic Conference.  Please submit proposals to Yeny Rodriguez at yerodriguez@icesi.edu.co.

Questions?  Please contact:  Luis Diaz Matajira at luidiaz@uniandes.edu.co  or Yeny Rodriguez at yerodriguez@icesi.edu.co

 

Subconference in Family Business Research at the 9th International Research Meeting in Business and Management (IRMBAM-2018)

Subconference in Family Business Research at the 9th International Research Meeting in Business and Management (IRMBAM-2018)

We warmly invite you to submit your paper for presentation in the Subconference on Family Business Research
organized by Andrea Calabrò (IPAG Business School) at the 9th International Research Meeting in Business and
Management that will take place on 5-7th July 2018 at IPAG Business School, Nice Campus, France. We welcome both theoretical and empirical contributions on family business research, with emphasis on management and governance; entrepreneurial behaviors and dynamics; succession; internationalization; innovation; financing choices; emotional dynamics and conflict management; as well as empirical and theoretical studies which help bringing forward the understanding of the family business phenomenon across different countries and cultures.
Within the subconference on Family Business Research there will be a Special Session on “Family Business Management, Governance and Transgenerational Entrepreneurship” with a keynote speech which will be held by Alessandro Minichilli (Bocconi University, Italy). Moreover, Shaker Zahra (University of Minnesota, USA), who will
do one of the keynotes of the overall conference, will participate in this special session.
Only papers in English are considered. They must be submitted electronically at:
https://ipag-irm.sciencesconf.org/user/submit
Please choose the Topic “Subconference in Family Business Research” when you submit your paper.

IMPORTANT DATES

  • Submission deadline (full paper): April 8, 2018
  • Notification of review results: May 4, 2018
  • Registration deadline: June 4, 2018
  • Conference event: July 5-7, 2018

FURTHER INFORMATION
For queries, please contact the organizer at a.calabro @ ipag.fr or ipag-irm @ sciencesconf.org